Tag Archives: wellbeing

A Day with Phillip Day – The Maximum Health Workshop

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Today I was blessed with the opportunity to attend a fascinating seminar by one of the world’s most experienced health researchers.

As a volunteer at a local charity (Together Against Cancer, who commit to informing the public about natural, ‘alternative’ forms of healing and wellness), the request for help at the event was sprung on me at the last minute. I’d already do anything for the centre – it’s run by such an inspiring, amazing group of people who are so knowledgeable and committed to what they do – but having read some of Phillip Day’s work, I was never going to turn down this chance.

And oh my, what a Day.. For 6 hours (which flew by) he covered so much, that it’s still kind of digesting in my system (no pun intended). This included, but certainly wasn’t limited to how:

  • We live in a completely false reality, from food to education to news reports
  • Sickness is bigger than war, and is the biggest business on earth
  • Between 2000-2015, pharmaceutical drugs have killed more people than World War 1 and World War 2 combined
  • Since 2000, 16 million Americans have died as a result of the effects of chemotherapy, not cancer itself
  • Being ‘cured’ of cancer is actually defined as survival after 5 years of initial treatment
  • Most diseases and ailments are metabolic, i.e. caused by a severely weakened immune system/ unhealthy gut
  • Chemotherapy and radiation destroys your immune system
  • Vaccines at birth serve no purpose and in fact do more harm than good
  • Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed in as little as 7 days
  • A plethora of ex-medical professionals are becoming whistleblowers to the twisted and inherently murderous medical system
  • Big Pharma are desperately trying to silence Day and other organisations who are making this information public

Did you know it’s actually illegal in the European Union to state that food is key to curing and preventing disease, and that drinking water cures dehydration? Call me stupid, but that’s some pretty insane logic.

It’s absolutely mental how governments and society convince us to doubt the wisdom of our senses. And to trust in doctors, who have zero nutritional education and are trained by pharmaceutical companies, literally just to push drugs in an attempt to cover up symptoms and zombify the masses.

Probably even more worrying than the sinister set up and power these organisations have, is what Day calls ‘cognitive dissonance’ – that being, wilful ignorance by we, the people, and a refusal to question anything.

We’re raised in a culture where we’re convinced from day 1 that doctors are the fountain of all knowledge, that pharmaceutical companies want to help us (why on earth would they ever offer us cures, when that would mean the immediate halt of cash flow?) and that our government is acting in our best interests (despite the fact they’re also endorsed by those same companies).

Day highlights the importance of diet and nutrition in preventing and reversing disease through 5 simple principles:Image result for campaign for truth in medicine

  1. 80% plant-based made of organic wholefoods
  2. 60% raw (80% is even better)
  3. Keep animal products under 15%
  4. Eliminate all refined sugar, wheat and dairy
  5. Adopt an intermittent fasting/autophagy regime

He also delves into the structure of the human body on a much deeper, cellular and energetic level, discussing the intricacies of DNA and the information we store. It was mind-blowing stuff and certainly gets you thinking (an amount more than already being contended with!).

He takes time to cover the array of vitamins and minerals we need to function, where to obtain these and how best to prepare the body to absorb and utilise them.

This is literally only scratching the surface of the presentation, and this summary serves only to inform, remind and reassure us that there are other ‘crackpots’ discussing and promoting alternatives to what we’ve been programmed to believe about our health, longevity and life on earth in general.

But as always, I urge you not to take my word as gospel (I’m sure there’s no risk of that) and to do your own research. If something about this resonates with you, don’t stay stuck in cognitive dissonance – we live in the age of information, and were incarnated at this time for a reason. Use the power of the internet and all the knowledge that is offered to find that which you are seeking. 

Healing Garlic, Ginger and Butterbean Soup

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It’s mid December! Which means it’s cold outside (cue cosy jumpers, hoodies and scarves), party season is upon us and Christmas is just around the corner. Plenty to get excited about!

But with that excitement usually comes extra strain on our bodies and minds; lack of sunlight, indulgence in naughty foods and alcohol and excess stress over pulling together the perfect Christmas can all take its toll on us physically.

So if you’re feeling a little under the weather, this nourishing soup is the perfect pick-me-up.

Garlic boasts amazing antibacterial and antiviral properties, while ginger stimulates immune function and helps fight infection, as well as reduces nausea. Together they pack a mighty nutritional punch, and combined with onion (also a natural antiviral decongestant) these benefits are boosted even further.

On top of that, butterbeans are a fabulous source of B-vitamins, iron, zinc, magnesium, fibre and protein. And along with cashews, which are packed with eye, heart and blood healthy vitamins and minerals, they help give the soup a warming, creamy consistency.

Even more to get excited about, this dish is so easy to make!

Ingredients:

1 head of garlic

3 carrots

1 tin butterbeans, rinsed and drained 

2 red onions

4-6 inches ginger

3 spring onions (plus extra to garnish)

Handful cashew nuts

1 1/2 tbsp dried oregano

Pinch of paprika

500ml vegetable stock

50ml almond milk

Method:

Preheat the oven to 200°c.

Drizzle a little olive oil in a baking tray and add the carrot and whole garlic cloves. I left the skin on the garlic for added nutrients, but these can be removed before blending if you prefer. 

Coat well in oil, 1/2 tbsp oregano, paprika and a little salt and black pepper, then roast for 20-30 min until soft, shuffling and turning half way.

Meanwhile season the butterbeans with 1 tbsp dried oregano and black pepper. Roughly chop the red onion, ginger and spring onions. 

Sautée the red onions and ginger for 3-4 min, then add the butterbeans for another 5 mins. Finally add the spring onions, carrot and garlic for the last 2 min.

Stir in vegetable stock, bring to boil, cover and then reduce to simmer for about 5 mins.

Add to blender (I used an immersion blender) along with almond milk and pulse until soft and creamy.

Serve and garnish with chopped spring onion.

Enjoy, and embrace the healing feeling and delicious flavours, while those antibodies get hard at work fighting your physical corner!

Healthy Spicy Chorizo Pasta

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Another quick and healthy dish, this chorizo pasta is filling and nutritous (and delicious).

Ingredients (serves 4):

Virgin olive oil
Sliced chorizo
400g tinned tomatos
1 red pepper (chopped)
2 handfuls spinach
2-3 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
1 large onion (chopped)
Cayenne pepper
Chilli powder/flakes
Black pepper
Wholegrain pasta

All you need to do:

Sautée the peppers and onion for 4-5 mins until the onion is yellow. Add garlic for another 2-3 min.

Pour in tomatos and chorizo, add spices, simmer on low heat for 5 mins. Throw in spinach for a further 2 min. Add cooked pasta and stir through. Serve immediately.

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Don’t forget to store your leftovers for lunch at work, etc ✌

Coconut-Curried Veg (Undercover)

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Dont like vegetables much, but want to live healthier? Give this easy-peasy dish a go.

If you’re looking for an ‘easier’ way to consume more vegetables, but battle with how boring it can seem, I’d like to share one of my own quick and easy tacts that can help make eating greens healthy, tasty and even fun.

One could call it a vegetable curry, but I prefer ‘curried vegetables’. Just because most curries take specific and precise amounts of spices and cooking technique. Whereas this here is a loose, almost homage, curry – based dish.

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My motivation was actually from attempting to up my vegetable intake but being unable to withstand the (sometimes) bland taste of greens. Now I’ve come to realise I can eat (and enjoy) any vegetable if it’s combined with some more exciting ingredients. And if chopped into tiny bite size pieces, you might even convince the kids to give it a bash too!

This is one of my favourite ‘curry’ dishes, for which I throw in brocolli (again!), green beans and spinach as my main veggies. It’s so delicious and simple to make, and I often take the leftovers to work with a fresh naan or chapatti.

Ingredients:

•1-2 inch grated/ground ginger
•4 cloves garlic, chopped/ground
•1-2 large yellow or white onions, chopped
•Curry paste of your choice
•400g coconut milk
•1-3 Tsp cayenne pepper
•1-3 tsp ground turmeric
•Half head of brocolli
•Handful green beans
•2 handfuls spinach
•Olive oil
•Coriander (to season)

Simply:

Brown the onions with the spices for roughly 5-6 mins in a deep(ish) frying pan. Add the garlic and ginger for 3-4 mins until aromatic.

Stir in coconut milk and curry paste, and reduce heat to a simmer.

Throw in brocolli for 3 mins, followed by the green beans and finally the spinach. Serve and top with the coriander.

In total the veg should take 6 minutes: 6 for broccoli, 4 for green beans and 2 for spinach.  Try not to overdo the vegetables as they can not only lose their flavour and become rubbery, but they’ll also lose their nutrients. And then you’re just eating empty greens.

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Depending on your taste buds, you could also add more spices or fresh chilli to the veg, for an extra hot kick.

Stir all in well to ensure even coverage. If you find you need a little more ‘juice’ you can add water and a little more curry paste. Or if it needs thickening up, a dash of cream.

And voila. Easy, nutritous and delicious!

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Those ingredients listed are rough measurements but experimentation is key.  You can combine any veg/spices of your choice and even substitute coconut milk for tinned/fresh tomatos if you prefer. The key is to get those spices penetrating well enough to make you forget you’re even eating (healthy) greens, and really get that heated, aromatic ‘curry’ feeling going on.

Serve with rice, naan, chapatti, or whatever you like.

Peace out my loves, and good eating.